The graphic illustrations show the various forms of torture Abu Zubaydah said he experienced at a US black site in Thailand.

NYT: This is what Abu Zubaydah revealed about US torture

The graphic illustrations show the various forms of torture Abu Zubaydah said he experienced at a US black site in Thailand. The New York Times

The New York Times has published a report by journalist Carol Rosenberg, in which she talks about the CIA’s torture program, as described by the detainee at Guantanamo Abu Zubaydah.

The report indicates that one of the paintings shows the prisoner naked and tied on a cannon and his whole body is taut, while an investigator charges him with drowning, while there are others showing him and his wrists tied to very high bars, forcing him to stand on the tip of his toes, with a neglected wound on his left leg, accompanied by a cry from his open mouth, as well as a third plaque showing a prisoner hitting his head against a wall.

Rosenberg comments that these are the drawings drawn by the captive Abu Zubaydah at Guantanamo. They depict the various methods of torture he suffered during his four years in the CIA’s “black sites” secret prisons.

The newspaper states that this is the first time that pictures like this are published in the “New York Times”, noting that they are strong drawings and reflect a personal experience, and humanize what was being talked about in common culture inaccurately, so it is sometimes described as the improved methods of investigation that America uses in Secret prisons during a crackdown on al-Qaeda members after the attacks of 11 September 2001.

The report states that in each drawing drawn by Abu Zubaydah, who was the first person to undergo the investigation program approved by the administration of President George W. Bush, he portrayed a method of torture used in a black CIA position in Thailand in August 2002.

An image drawn by Abu Zubaydah, a prisoner at Guantánamo Bay, shows how the C.I.A. applied an approved torture technique called “cramped confinement.”Credit...Abu Zubaydah, Courtesy Mark P. Denbeaux
Abu Zubaydah’s paintings depict the various methods of torture he was subjected to in secret prisons – New York Times

The author finds that these drawings demonstrate that more than a decade after the Obama administration banned the program – and then partly declassified the Senate investigation that found that the CIA had lied about the effectiveness and brutality of the program – there is still a final chapter on the black sites not written distance.

The newspaper notes that these drawings were drawn by Abu Zubaydah, 48, this year in Guantanamo, to be included in a 61-page report entitled “How America Is Torturing,” to his lawyer, Mark Deenbo, a professor at Law School at Seton Hall University. And some of his students.

The report notes that this report uses preliminary accounts, internal memos of the Bush administration, prisoner diaries, and the 2014 Senate report to analyze the investigation program, stating that the program was originally designed for Abu Zubaydah, who mistakenly thought to be a senior al-Qaeda officer.

Rosenberg states that he was arrested during a clash in Faisalabad, Pakistan, in March 2002, where he was seriously injured in his left thigh, and was sent to the CIA prison network.

The newspaper reveals that after an internal conversation about whether Abu Zubaydah was responsive to FBI investigators, the agency hired the same global CIA contractors to create the currently prohibited program, which uses violence, isolation, and sleep prevention on more than 100 men in secret locations, some of which They are described as immune centers with undercover guards and medical personnel.

According to the report, he began describing these methods by leaking more than a decade ago, usually with painful details, but sometimes with simplified drawings (written drawings) of what the prisoners went through, realizing that the drawings that were published in the recent period represent specific methods of the CIA, which were done Its endorsement, described and categorized in notes prepared by the Bush administration, as well as it shows these methods from the perspective of the person who fell under torture, Abu Zubaydah, a Palestinian whose real name is Zine El Abidine Mohamed Hussein.

The writer asserts that he is the first person who the CIA experimented with the method of drowning illusion – which he has undergone 83 times – and is the first person who knew that he was confined to a narrow box as part of what the University of Seaton Hall study describes as a “continuous shower” of the methods intended to break what Investigators believed it was his resistance.

The newspaper notes that subsequent intelligence analyzes showed that Abu Zubaydah was a jihadist, but he had no previous information about the September 11 attacks, was not a member of al-Qaeda, and no charges were brought against him, and court documents show that he has no prosecutors The military has no intention of doing so.

The report shows that Abu Zubaydah is detained in the most secret al-Qaeda prisons (camp No. 7), where he drew these drawings not as an artwork, and prevents them from being released from Guantanamo, but as a legal material that has been reviewed and approved – after one has been deleted – to include in The study, and other pictures he had drawn for himself during his imprisonment were published on the website Proplica.

The illusion of drowning

Rosenberg reports that in this photo, the prisoner depicts himself naked tied on a plate, his head covered, and his right foot twisted in pain, noting that this image is different from the images seen in the prevailing culture. One of the paintings displayed in the Washington Museum, for example, shows a guard pouring water on the face A prisoner wearing an ordered prison suit.

The newspaper says that the personal image shows a design detail that was not found in the other pictures, which is a separator that allows the prisoner’s head to tilt back, and belts that attach his injured thigh to the plate.

The report notes that the Senate Intelligence Committee study of the intelligence agency program concluded that the illusion of drowning and other methods was “brutal and much worse than what the agency described,” noting that the use of this method led to convulsions and vomiting, and made Abu Zubaida completely unresponsive with Bubbles rise through his mouth completely filled with (water). “

An image drawn by Abu Zubaydah, a prisoner at Guantánamo Bay, shows how the C.I.A. applied an approved torture technique called “cramped confinement.”Credit...Abu Zubaydah, Courtesy Mark P. Denbeaux
An image drawn by Abu Zubaydah, a prisoner at Guantánamo Bay, shows how the C.I.A. applied an approved torture technique called “cramped confinement.”Credit…Abu Zubaydah, Courtesy Mark P. Denbeaux

The writer found that in a description that was now declassified, he had presented it to his lawyer in 2008, Abu Zubaydah described the first session of drifting drifting from 83 sessions like this: “They kept pouring water and focused on my nose and mouth until I felt I was drowning, and my chest wanted to explode from Lack of oxygen. “

Stress positions

The newspaper says that the detainees’ accounts of this method and how it was used in the black sites differed. In his drawing, Abu Zubaydah shows himself naked and his wrists tied to a bar above his head, where he is forced to stand on the ends of his toes.

The report states that, according to his account, as reported by his lawyer, he was still recovering from what the CIA described as a major wound in his thigh, and he tried to focus his weight on the other leg, and told the lawyers: “Hours have passed and I stand with this situation .. My hands are bound to Upper bar. “

An image drawn by Abu Zubaydah, a prisoner at Guantánamo Bay, shows how the C.I.A. applied an approved torture technique called “cramped confinement.”Credit...Abu Zubaydah, Courtesy Mark P. Denbeaux
Abu Zubaydah, Courtesy Mark P. Denbeaux

Rosenberg quoted him as saying that some guards “noticed the color of my hand” and then moved him to a chair “and continued to investigate, cold, hunger, lack of sleep and vomiting, which I do not know if it was due to cold or (insure syrup) or commotion,” (and the intelligence agency was feeding the prisoners only with a drink Insure Diet).

Short entry

The newspaper notes that Abu Zubaydah, who was not known to have studied art, painted himself with a fetus-bound bag and chain bound to a rod in the dungeon to limit his movement, and the former Deputy Prosecutor, Guy Baby, said in an 18-page memo, on the date of 1 August 2002 to give the CIA approval to use similar methods: “By watching Abu Zubaydah in captivity, you indicated that he was very flexible in spite of his wound,” and he indicated in that memo that permission was given based on the CIA’s assertion that “these conditions are not Designed to cause pain associated with sprains of the body.

An image drawn by Abu Zubaydah, a prisoner at Guantánamo Bay, shows how the C.I.A. applied an approved torture technique called “cramped confinement.”Credit...Abu Zubaydah, Courtesy Mark P. Denbeaux
Abu Zubaydah, Courtesy Mark P. Denbeaux

Hit the head on the wall

The report notes that this drawing came out of Guantanamo after Abu Zubaydah’s portrayal of the investigator’s face, which was covered in a black square, was covered. The picture shows the jailer wrapped a towel on his neck, while he was hitting his head on a wood plank fixed on a concrete wall.

An image drawn by Abu Zubaydah, a prisoner at Guantánamo Bay, shows how the C.I.A. applied an approved torture technique called “cramped confinement.”Credit...Abu Zubaydah, Courtesy Mark P. Denbeaux
Abu Zubaydah, Courtesy Mark P. Denbeaux

And the writer quotes him as saying about that experience: “He kept hitting my head against the wall,” describing the experiment as having lost sight “for a few moments”, and with every stroke he was laying on the floor, and being dragged with a towel on which he wrapped a plastic tape, “which caused a bleeding in my neck Then he receives a slap in the face.

The Big Prison Fund

In this photo, Abu Zubaydah appears shaved, naked, and bound so that he cannot stand, and according to his account, he was sitting in a pail supposed to be using a bathroom, and he said: “I found myself in total darkness … and the only place I could sit on the pail Because the place was very narrow. “

An image drawn by Abu Zubaydah, a prisoner at Guantánamo Bay, shows how the C.I.A. applied an approved torture technique called “cramped confinement.”Credit...Abu Zubaydah, Courtesy Mark P. Denbeaux
Abu Zubaydah, Courtesy Mark P. Denbeaux

According to the report, Abu Zubaydah describes in his account how he was confined to a “large wooden box that looked like a coffin.” For the first time he saw him, the guards put him upright, and a man in black clothes and a military jacket said to him: “From now on, this will be your home.” He pointed out that Abu Zubaydah drew himself with both eyes, and an early image of him appears in Guantanamo, wearing a hood over an eye after an injured eye was removed.

Small prison box

Rosenberg says the small box is like a box on display in the Spy Museum, which children crawl inside during their visit, noting that in his novel published in the Seton Hall University report, Abu Zubaydah describes the time he spent in what he calls the “dog box” as “very painful” .

And the newspaper quotes Abu Zubaydah, saying: “Once they closed me inside the box I tried my best to stand up, but to no avail because the box is too short, I tried to take the situation of the latecomer, but to no avail because it is very narrow”, and it was linked to the fetus position as he describes ” For long hours, “which caused him muscle spasms, and said:” The pain was great, which made me scream without awareness. “

Sleep deprivation

The report states that Abu Zubaydah remembers that the wardens used the “horizontal sleep deprivation” method by restricting it horizontally to the ground in a painful position that does not allow them to sleep, and the CIA justified the sleep deprivation by saying that it “focuses the detainee’s mind on his current situation instead of his ideological goals”, In endorsing this method in August 2002, Pepe said that the agency said it would not deprive Abu Zubaydah of sleep “for more than 11 days at a time”.

The graphic illustrations show the various forms of torture Abu Zubaydah said he experienced at a US black site in Thailand.
The graphic illustrations show the various forms of torture Abu Zubaydah said he experienced at a US black site in Thailand.

And the author notes that Abu Zubaydah states in the study of Seton Hall University, that he was deprived of sleep “perhaps for two or three weeks or even more”.

“The New York Times” concludes its report by referring to his saying: “I felt it was forever, to the point that I found myself wary despite the guards throwing water on me.” In this picture, the prisoner paints himself in light clothes.

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